Dating Photo Tip #002: Try not to cover your face

Dating Photo Tip #002: Try not to cover your face

Keep costumes, hats, sunglasses and other items that cover your face to a minimum.

While it might be tempting to only upload snaps from the beach, where you’re adoring an awesome hat and Ray-ban’s, not being able to see a perspective date’s face is off putting. Adding a couple of shots of you on holiday, wearing a costume, or possibly activity related headgear (such as a helmet) is great for adverting your lifestyle, but these should be limited to a couple of photos and accompanied by other clear face and body images.

If you’re not recognisable from your dating profile pictures, you’re making a big mistake and, if your meeting for the first time from an app, your date may not recognise you at the meeting point. Or, in the worst instances, you might be identified, but your date decides to walk past as they feel the advertising doesn’t match the product.

As you may have read in the Mole-Strosity worst date story, finding the date was bald and with a large facial mole made for an unsuccessful meeting. If you have a distinguishing feature, then embrace it! It adds character and unique selling point, to put you ahead of potential rivals. Plus, different people are attracted to different things – for example, I hate a hairy chest and back, but another contributor on the site loves a bear. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, so there’s no need to wear a mask.

Dating Photo Tip #001: Check Auto Uploads

Dating Photo Tip #001: Check Auto Uploads

Always check the default photo uploads from your social media account.

Many dating apps, including Tinder, Happn, PoF and Eharmony, make it simpler to create a dating profile by retrieving images and other information from linked social media accounts – Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, etc. This facility will usually upload your last eight profile pictures, though users are given the option to select alternatives from other albums.

The reason to check the default uploads is twofold. Firstly, you’re opening yourself up to social media stalking. Even suites that you didn’t swipe right for can track you down by matching your name and photos to a social media account. Unless your settings are configured for maximum privacy or there is no embarrassing content on your profile; your date may get to see you in a different light before you have even met.

Secondly, the upload may contain pictures of you and your ex or other incriminating incidents. Below are several screen shots friends and I shared with one and other of profiles that contained a guy’s wedding photos. Please note, these were screen-grabbed in 2014 and faces have been pixelated for their privacy, but they give you an idea of possible photo faux pas that occur when users don’t check the auto uploaded pictures.

Wedding photo on Tinder
Wedding photo on Tinder
Wedding photo on Tinder